Can Blood Clots Dissove on their own

Can Blood Clots Dissolve on their Own?

Blood clotting processes in the body are natural. The body manufactures a number of components involved in the development of blood clots to begin the clotting process. This is essential to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is injured through blunt force trauma, a cut, or other types of injuries.

The clotting process also initiates repair and healing of such injury.

Blood clots, depending on the severity of the injury, can dissolve on their own. How does this work?

Blood clots formation and dissolving

Blood clots develop from a process that involves a number of blood components including proteins and platelets. This process forms a clot over a blood vessel injury. The same process in reverse has the capability of breaking the clot down.

In scenarios where the blood clot is formed, it can dissolve on its own when a protein is known as plasmin (a component of the clot itself) is activated by another substance in the body known as an activator. This triggers a process similar to a “self-destruct” button that breaks up the net-like structure of the clot.

Some clotting processes are visible and take place on the outside of the body, such as a cut, scratch, or more specifically, during the formation and dissolving of a scab.

A blood clot that forms inside the blood vessel, and is not necessarily caused by an injury but by sluggish blood flow, narrowed arteries, or other factors often associated with poor lifestyle habits, may require man-made interventions such as anticoagulation therapy or drugs known as clot busters.

Blood thinners or anticoagulants are a common resource when it comes to dealing with deep vein thrombosis or DVT, otherwise known as blood clots that develop in the large veins, most commonly the leg. The danger with a DVT is the potential of the blood clot to dislodge from the wall of the artery and travel through the bloodstream until it reaches the lung, resulting in a pulmonary embolism (PE) that cuts off the blood supply in the lung. This prevents the lung from oxygenating blood returning to the heart. This scenario is potentially life-threatening.

Drugs known as blood thinners don’t dissolve clots per se but prevent them from growing larger and also prevent the formation of new blood clots. This allows the body the time to naturally break up the clot on its own.

Clot-busting drugs designed specifically to treat pulmonary embolisms are capable of breaking down the blood clot by instigating the release of plasmid, which like with natural blood clot dissolving scenarios, gives the body a head start in also destroying the pulmonary embolism.

Regaining health

Some blood clots are relatively harmless, while others can be life-threatening. DVTs and pulmonary embolisms are not to be underestimated. It can take weeks for such clots to dissolve and for an individual to recover. With proper medical care, however, these blood clots will eventually dissolve, but individuals who have experienced such clots must be aware that they have a potential to return when lifestyle habits such as poor diet, smoking, or immobility are involved.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts

Education

Richard Cohen’s Story with Blood Clots

A special thank you to Richard M. Cohen for helping the American Blood Clot Association to educate the public about the danger of blood clots. Mr. Cohen has been the recipient of numerous awards in journalism, including three Emmys, a George Foster Peabody and a Cable Ace Award. He is married to journalist, Meredith Vieira

Read More »
Education

Blood Clot or Charlie Horse?

We’ve all felt it – that teeth-grinding muscle spasm in the arch of the foot, the back of the calf, or the back of the thigh (hamstrings). When do you know if that Charlie Horse is more than a muscle cramp? What if you get them often? How can you tell the difference between a

Read More »
Science

Does Aspirin Cause Blood Clots?

Aspirin is an over-the-counter product that’s been used for generations, not only to reduce pain and fever, but for other benefits as well. Does aspirin cause blood clots? No. That doesn’t mean that using it is without risks for some. One of the benefits of low-dose aspirin (around 75 mg to 80 mg) daily has the potential

Read More »
Prevention

Foods that Prevent Blood Clots

Blood clots form for a number of reasons: a surgical procedure, obesity, a medical condition, or an injury. Blood thinning and anticoagulation medications are commonly prescribed to prevent blood clots for individuals at risk. In addition to medication, a number of foods prove beneficial in preventing the development of blood clots.Blood clots are commonly formed

Read More »
Education

Pulmonary Embolism Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention

What is a pulmonary embolism? Pulmonary embolism defines the sudden blockage of a pulmonary artery inside the lung by an embolus, typically from a blood clot that has an origin somewhere else in the body, such as a deep vein thrombosis of the leg. When it comes to defining signs and pulmonary embolism symptoms, the

Read More »
Education

How is Someone Tested for Blood Clots?

A definitive diagnosis of the presence of a blood clot can be performed at your doctor’s office or hospital setting. Depending on the suspected location of the blood clot and the type, a physician has a number of options at his or her disposal. Among them include:  Blood tests  CT scans  Ultrasounds  MRIs How do blood

Read More »
Scroll to Top